To Finland

While traveling, the animal must be accompanied by its owner or a person responsible. The following requirements apply to dogs (cats, ferrets) that aren't intended for sale or hand-over to another owner.

First of all, animals must be identifiable by a legible tattoo or a microchip compliant with ISO 1784 norm or Annex A to ISO 11785 norm. If the chip is not compliant with any of these norms, the animal owner or carer must be prepared to read the microchip number at all times, i.e. have a reader. Identification of the animal must be preceded by a rabies vaccination (first, the animal is ID-ed, only then vaccinated).

Next, the animal must be vaccinated against rabies with an inactivated vaccine consisting of at least one antigen unit/dosage (WHO standard). The vaccination must be performed according to manufacturer's recommendations and it becomes valid after 21 days, if it is the first vaccination for an animal older than 3 months old. (Commission’s decision no. 2005/91/WE of 2 Feb 2005, which determines when the rabies vaccination is considered valid). In case of follow-up vaccinations made regularly at intervals (booster dose), vaccination becomes valid on the day the booster was injected. If the owner or the person responsible for the animal doesn't have a certificate of vaccination in the previous year, the next vaccination is treated as the first one and becomes valid after 21 days. Young dogs, cats and ferrets without rabies vaccination cannot be brought to Finland.

At least 30 days before their journey into Finland, dogs and cats must undergo deworming (with praziquantel or epsiprantel). Deworming must be documented in the animal’s passport.

Animals must have a passport issued by a qualified vet.
Identification details of the animal, a certificate of valid rabies vaccination and vaccine effectiveness results must be certified in the passport by a qualified vet. Deworming must be also documented in the animal’s passport by a vet.

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